Epilepsy Huzur Vadisi by KarenYeomans.com


About

Stress can increase seizure activity in epileptics.

Asana (physical postures), meditation and pranayama (breathing techniques) can relax the body and mind, reducing levels of the stress hormone cortisol, lowering the heart rate and blood pressure, and calming an overworked nervous system.

Clinical studies suggest that yoga and meditation can significantly reduce stress, decrease seizure frequency, give epilepsy sufferers more sense of control over their condition, and improve their quality of life, thus making them useful additions to epilepsy treatment.


What the clinical studies say

Yoga
  • Improves quality of life
  • Reduction in seizure duration
  • Significant decrease in seizure frequency
  • Significant improvement in parasympathetic parameters
Meditation
  • Improved EEG management
  • Improved seizure control
  • Reduces stress
  • Significant improvement in Visual Contrast Sensitivity (VCS)

The clinical studies

Effects of yoga on the autonomic nervous system, gamma-aminobutyric-acid, and allostasis in epilepsy, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

A theory is proposed to explain the benefits of yoga practices in diverse, frequently comorbid medical conditions based on the concept that yoga practices reduce allostatic load in stress response systems such that optimal homeostasis is restored.

It is hypothesized that stress induces (1) imbalance of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) with decreased parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) and increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, (2) underactivity of the gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) system, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter system, and (3) increased allostatic load. It is further hypothesized that yoga-based practices (4) correct underactivity of the PNS and GABA systems in part through stimulation of the vagus nerves, the main peripheral pathway of the PNS, and (5) reduce allostatic load. Depression, epilepsy, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic pain exemplify medical conditions that are exacerbated by stress, have low heart rate variability (HRV) and low GABAergic activity, respond to pharmacologic agents that increase activity of the GABA system, and show symptom improvement in response to yoga-based interventions.

The observation that treatment resistant cases of epilepsy and depression respond to vagal nerve stimulation corroborates the need to correct PNS underactivity as part of a successful treatment plan in some cases. According to the proposed theory, the decreased PNS and GABAergic activity that underlies stress-related disorders can be corrected by yoga practices resulting in amelioration of disease symptoms. This has far-reaching implications for the integration of yoga-based practices in the treatment of a broad array of disorders exacerbated by stress.
Citations

84
Authors

C. C. Streeter | P.L. Gerbarg
Published

2012
Journal

Medical Hypotheses
Volume / Issue

78:5
Author's primary institution

Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, US
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and yoga for drug-refractory epilepsy: a randomized controlled trial.
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

Objective:

There is a need for controlled outcome studies on behavioral treatment of epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and yoga in the treatment of epilepsy.

Methods:

The design consisted of a randomized controlled trial with repeated measures (N = 18). All participants had an EEG-verified epilepsy diagnosis with drug-refractory seizures. Participants were randomized into one of two groups: ACT or yoga. Therapeutic effects were measured using seizure index (frequency × duration) and quality of life (Satisfaction with Life Scale, WHOQOL-BREF). The treatment protocols consisted of 12 hours of professional therapy distributed in two individual sessions, two group sessions during a 5-week period, and booster sessions at 6 and 12 months post treatment. Seizure index was continuously assessed during the 3-month baseline and 12-month follow-up. Quality of life was measured after treatment and at the 6-month and 1-year follow-ups.

Results:

The results indicate that both ACT and yoga significantly reduce seizure index and increase quality of life over time. ACT reduced seizure index significantly more as compared with yoga. Participants in both the ACT and yoga groups improved their quality of life significantly as measured by one of two quality-of-life instruments. The ACT group increased their quality of life significantly as compared with the yoga group as measured by the WHOQOL-BREF, and the yoga group increased their quality of life significantly as compared with the ACT group as measured by the SWLS.

Conclusions:

The results of this study suggest that complementary treatments, such as ACT and yoga, decrease seizure index and increase quality of life.
Citations

88
Authors

T Lundgren | J Dahl | N Yardi | L Melin
Published

2008
Journal

Epilepsy Behaviour
Volume / Issue

13:1
Author's primary institution

Department of Psychology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden
Modulation of cardiac autonomic balance with adjuvant yoga therapy in patients with refractory epilepsy.
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

The practice of yoga regulates body physiology through control of posture, breathing, and meditation. Effects of yoga on autonomic functions of patients with refractory epilepsy, as quantified by standardized autonomic function tests (AFTs), were determined.

The yoga group (n = 18) received supervised training in yoga, and the exercise group (n = 16) practiced simple routine exercises. AFTs were repeated after 10 weeks of daily sessions. Data were compared with those of healthy volunteers (n = 142).

The yoga group showed significant improvement in parasympathetic parameters and a decrease in seizure frequency scores. There was no improvement in blood pressure parameters in either group. Two patients in the yoga group achieved normal autonomic functions at the end of 10 weeks of therapy, whereas there were no changes in the exercise group.

The data suggest that yoga may have a role as an adjuvant therapy in the management of autonomic dysfunction in patients with refractory epilepsy.
Citations

38
Authors

T N Sathyapranha | P Satishchandra | C Pradhan | S Sinha | B Kaveri | K Thennarasu | B T Murthy | T R Raju
Published

2008
Journal

Epilepsy Behaviour
Volume / Issue

12:2
Author's primary institution

Department of Neurophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India
Effect of Sahaka yoga meditation on auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and visual contast sensitivity (VCS) in epileptics
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

The effect of Sahaja yoga meditation on 32 patients with primary idiopathic epilepsy on regular and maintained antiepileptic medication was studied.

The patients were randomly divided into 3 groups: group I practiced Sahaja Yoga meditation twice daily for 6 months under proper guidance; group II practiced postural exercises mimicking the meditation for the same duration; and group III was the control group. Visual Contrast Sensitivity (VCS), Auditory Evoked Potentials (AEP), Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEP), and Mid Latency Responses (MLR) were recorded initially (0 month) and at 3 and 6 months for each group.

There was a significant improvement in VCS following meditation practice in group I participants. Na, the first prominent negative peak of MLR and Pa, the positive peak following Na did not register changes in latency. The Na-Pa amplitude of MLR also showed a significant increase. There were no significant changes in the absolute and interpeak latencies of BAEP. The reduced level of stress following meditation practice may make patients more responsive to specific stimuli.

Sahaja Yoga meditation appears to bring about changes in some of the electrophysiological responses studied in epileptic patients.
Citations

43
Authors

U Panjwani | S H Singh | H L Gupta | S Mukhopadhay | L. Thakur
Published

2000
Journal

Applied Psychotherapy and Biofeedback
Volume / Issue

25:1
Author's primary institution

Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Lucknow Road, Delhi, 110 054, India
Effect of Sahaja yoga practice on seizure control & EEG changes in patients of epilepsy/
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

The effect of Sahaja yoga meditation on seizure control and electroencephalographic alterations was assessed in 32 patients of idiopathic epilepsy.

The subjects were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group I (n = 10) practised Sahaja yoga for 6 months, Group II (n = 10) practised exercises mimicking Sahaja yoga for 6 months and Group III (n = 12) served as the epileptic control group.

Group I subjects reported a 62 per cent decrease in seizure frequency at 3 months and a further decrease of 86 per cent at 6 months of intervention. Power spectral analysis of EEG showed a shift in frequency from 0-8 Hz towards 8-20 Hz. The ratios of EEG powers in delta (D), theta (T), alpha (A) and beta (B) bands i.e., A/D, A/D + T, A/T and A + B/D + T were increased. Per cent D power decreased and per cent A increased. No significant changes in any of the parameters were found in Groups II and III, indicating that Sahaja yoga practice brings about seizure reduction and EEG changes.

Sahaja yoga could prove to be beneficial in the management of patients of epilepsy.
Citations

79
Authors

U Panwani | W Selvamurthy | S H Singh | H L Gupta | L Thakur | U C Rai
Published

1996
Journal

The Indian Journal of Medical Research
Volume / Issue

103
Author's primary institution

Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences, New Delh
Effect of Sahaja Yoga Practice on stress management in patients of epilepsy
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

An attempt was made to evaluate the effect of Sahaja yoga meditation in stress management in patients of epilepsy.

The study was carried out on 32 patients of epilepsy who were randomly divided into 3 groups: group I subjects practised Sahaja yoga meditation for 6 months, group II subjects practised postural exercises mimicking Sahaja yoga and group III served as the epileptic control group. Galvanic skin resistance (GSR), blood lactate and urinary vinyl mandelic acid (U- VMA) were recorded at 0, 3 and 6 months.

There were significant changes at 3 & 6 months as compared to 0 month values in GSR, blood lactate and U- VMA levels in group I subjects, but not in group II and group III subjects.

The results indicate that reduction in stress following Sahaja yoga practice may be responsible for clinical improvement which had been earlier reported in patients who practised Sahaja yoga.
Citations

74
Authors

Usha Panjwani | H L Gupta | S H Singh | W Selvamurthy | U C Rai
Published

1995
Journal

Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Volume / Issue

39:2
Author's primary institution

Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Delhi
Yoga for control of epilepsy
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

Yoga is an age-old traditional Indian psycho–philosophical–cultural method of leading one’s life that alleviates stress, induces relaxation and provides multiple health benefits to the person following its system. It is a method of controlling the mind through the union of an individual’s dormant energy with the universal energy. Commonly practiced yoga methods are ‘Pranayama’ (controlled deep breathing), ‘Asanas’ (physical postures) and ‘Dhyana’ (meditation) admixed in varying proportions with differing philosophic ideas.

A review of yoga in relation to epilepsy encompasses not only seizure control but also many factors dealing with overall quality-of-life issues (QOL). This paper reviews articles related to yoga and epilepsy, seizures, EEG, autonomic changes, neuro-psychology, limbic system, arousal, sleep, brain plasticity, motor performance, brain imaging studies, and rehabilitation.

There is a dearth of randomized, blinded, controlled studies related to yoga and seizure control. A multi-centre, cross-cultural, preferably blinded (difficult for yoga), well-randomized controlled trial, especially using a single yogic technique in a homogeneous population such as Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is justified to find out how yoga affects seizure control and QOL of the person with epilepsy.
Citations

67
Authors

Nandan Yardi
Published

2001
Journal

Seizure
Volume / Issue

10:1
Author's primary institution

Yardi Epilepsy Clinic
Yoga for Epilepsy
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

Yoga may induce relaxation, stress reduction, influence the electroencephalogram and the autonomic nervous system, thereby controlling seizures. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy if proved effective
Citations

110
Authors

Sridharan Ramaratnam & Kalpana Sridharan
Published

2002
Journal

Cochrane Epilepsy Group
Volume / Issue

1
Author's primary institution

The Cochrane collaboration

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