HIV/AIDS Santillán by YogaClicks


About

An HIV or AIDS diagnosis is highly stressful and obviously emotionally devastating.

Yoga can lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol, boost emotional wellbeing (see also Depression), and improve the quality of our sleep.

The physical practice of yoga can help stretch tense muscles, while breathing exercises or pranayama, and meditation/mindfulness techniques, can also help create a more peaceful mind, restoring a sense of equanimity.

Sufferers can often feel isolated. Going to a class can help us feel part of something; we are not alone.

Clinical studies have shown yoga can reduce blood pressure in HIV patients and that mindfulness can boost immunity. This is what can make yoga and mindfulness helpful as a supplementary HIV treatment.


What the clinical studies say

Yoga
  • Improves quality of life
  • Lowers blood pressure
Mindfulness
  • Boosts immunity (buffers CD4+ T lymphocyte declines)

The clinical studies

Yoga lifestyle intervention reduces blood pressure in HIV-infected adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

Objective:

People living with HIV infection are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Safe and effective interventions for lowering CVD risk in HIV infection are high priorities. We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled study to evaluate whether a yoga lifestyle intervention improves CVD risk factors, virological or immunological status, or quality of life (QOL) in HIV-infected adults relative to standard of care treatment in a matched control group.

Methods:

Sixty HIV-infected adults with mild–moderate CVD risk were assigned to 20 weeks of supervised yoga practice or standard of care treatment. Baseline and week 20 measures were: 2-h oral glucose tolerance test with insulin monitoring, body composition, fasting serum lipid/lipoprotein profile, resting blood pressures, CD4 T-cell count and plasma HIV RNA, and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF)-36 health-related QOL inventory.

Results:

Resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures improved more (P=0.04) in the yoga group (−5 ± 2 and −3 ± 1 mmHg, respectively) than in the standard of care group (+1 ± 2 and+2 ± 2 mmHg, respectively). However, there was no greater reduction in body weight, fat mass or proatherogenic lipids, or improvements in glucose tolerance or overall QOL after yoga. Immune and virological status was not adversely affected.

Conclusion:

Among traditional lifestyle modifications, yoga is a low-cost, simple to administer, nonpharmacological, popular behavioural intervention that can lower blood pressure in pre-hypertensive HIV-infected adults with mild–moderate CVD risk factors.
Citations

46
Authors

WT Cade | DN Reeds | KE Mondy | ET Overton | J Grassino | S Tucker | C Bopp | E Laciny | S Hubert | S Lassa-Claxton | KE Yarasheski
Published

2010
Journal

HIV Medicine
Volume / Issue

11:6
Author's primary institution

Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine
Psycho-Endocrine-Immune Response to Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in Individuals Infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Quasiexperimental Study
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

Objectives:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a structured, 8-week, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program on perceived stress, mood, endocrine function, immunity, and functional health outcomes in individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Design:

This study used a quasiexperimental, nonrandomized design.

Methods:

Subjects were specifically recruited (nonrandom) for intervention (MBSR) or comparison group. Data were collected at pretest and post-test in the MBSR group and at matched times in the comparison group. t Tests where performed to determine within-group changes and between-group differences.

Results:

Natural killer cell activity and number increased significantly in the MBSR group compared to the comparison group. No significant changes or differences were found for psychological, endocrine, or functional health variables.

Conclusions:

These results provide tentative evidence that MBSR may assist in improving immunity in individuals infected with HIV.
Citations

117
Authors

F. Patrick Robinson | Herbert L. Mathews | Linda Witek-Janusek
Published

2003
Journal

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume / Issue

9:5
Author's primary institution

College of Nursing, university of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
Yoga may help reduce blood pressure in HIV-infected adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

Aim:

To evaluate the effect of a yoga lifestyle intervention on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, virological or immunological status, and QoL in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults.

Design:

Prospective, randomised, standard-care controlled trial with two parallel groups.

Setting:

Washington University AIDS Clinical Trial Unit and local infectious disease clinics, Washington, USA.

Participants:

Sixty HIV-infected adults, with a CD4+ T-cell count>200 cells/mL, plasma HIV RNA <15,000 copies/ml, atleast one CVD risk factor, were recruited. Subjectswere excluded if they had chronic hepatitis B oractive hepatitis C virus infection, diabetes, male hypogonadism, hypo- or hyperthyroidism, prior myocardial infarction, unstable angina, heart failure, coronary artery disease, resting ST-segment depression >1 mm, coronary artery bypass grafting, stroke, active substance abuse, or were pregnant or had plans to become pregnant.

Intervention:

Subjects were randomly assigned to yoga or standard-care using a 3:2 ratio. The experimental group received Ashtanga Vinyasa yoga, for 60 min, 2–3times a week for 20 weeks, under individual and group instruction of a certified yoga instructor. The control group received 20 weeks of continued standard care.

Main outcome measures:

The main outcomes were glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, plasma insulin levels, body composition, lipid profile, blood pressure, QoL, CD4+ T-cell number, plasma HIV RNA copies and nutrient intake.

Main results:

A statistically significant (P=0.04) reduction in resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure (-5 Ϯ 2 mmHgand -3 Ϯ 1 mmHg, respectively) was observed in the yoga group at 20 weeks, when compared to the standard-care group. Changes in other outcomes were not statistically significantly different between groups.

Authors’ conclusion:

In HIV-infected adults with mild-moderate cardi-ometabolic syndrome, 20 wks of supervised yoga significantly reduced resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures, despite the absence of parallel improvements in oral glucose tolerance, body weight, trunkfat content or proatherogenic lipid levels.’
Citations

0
Authors

M S Lee | K Yarasheski
Published

2011
Journal

Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies
Volume / Issue

16:2
Author's primary institution

Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea
Mindfulness meditation training effects on CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infected adults: A small randomized controlled trial
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

Mindfulness meditation training has stress reduction benefits in various patient populations, but its effects on biological markers of HIV-1 progression are unknown. The present study tested the efficacy of an 8-week Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation program compared to a 1-day control seminar on CD4+ T lymphocyte counts in stressed HIV infected adults.

A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with enrollment and follow-up occurring between November 2005 and December 2007. A diverse community sample of 48 HIV-1 infected adults was randomized and entered treatment in either an 8-week MBSR or a 1-day control stress reduction education seminar.

The primary outcome was circulating counts of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Participants in the 1-day control seminar showed declines in CD4+ T lymphocyte counts whereas counts among participants in the 8-week MBSR program were unchanged from baseline to post-intervention (time × treatment condition interaction, p = .02). This effect was independent of antiretroviral (ARV) medication use. Additional analyses indicated that treatment adherence to the mindfulness meditation program, as measured by class attendance, mediated the effects of mindfulness meditation training on buffering CD4+ T lymphocyte declines.

These findings provide an initial indication that mindfulness meditation training can buffer CD4+ T lymphocyte declines in HIV-1 infected adults.
Citations

127
Authors

J. David Creswell | Hector F. Myers | Steven W. Cole | Michael R. Irwin
Published

2009
Journal

Brain, Behavior and Immunity
Volume / Issue

23:2
Author's primary institution

Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, University of California, Los Angeles, 300 Medical Plaza, Suite 3109, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
A Pilot Feasibility and Acceptability Study of Yoga/Meditation on the Quality of Life and Markers of Stress in Persons Living with HIV Who Also Use Crack Cocaine
Practice
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
Abstract

Background:

Persons living with HIV (PLWH) who also use crack cocaine may have stressful, chaotic lives and typically do not engage in standard medical care that addresses a multitude of extenuating life circumstances. Yoga/meditation (YM) improves quality of life (QOL) and biomarkers of stress, but the effect of this intervention is almost unknown in PLWH, particularly those who use crack cocaine.

Objectives:

This pilot study sought to compare the feasibility and acceptability of 60-minute, twice-per-week sessions of YM for 2 months with those of no-contact control and to evaluate the effects of the intervention on QOL (according to the Short Form-36, Perceived Stress Scale [PSS], and Impact of Events Scale [IES]) and salivary cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) among PLWH who use crack cocaine.

Design:

Participants were randomly assigned to YM or no-contact control and were assessed at baseline, 2 months after the intervention, and 4 months' follow-up.

Results:

The YM program was acceptable and feasible, with high overall attendance (89%) and individual participation in yoga sessions (83%). YM participants showed modest improvements on QOL. The PSS total score and the IES intrusion score improved significantly 2 months after the intervention, but cortisol and DHEA-S did not change.

Conclusions:

This pilot study showed a high level of feasibility and acceptability and modest effects on measures of QOL among PLWH who use crack cocaine. The results suggest utility of YM as a simple, safe, and inexpensive format to improve QOL in a population that has many medical difficulties and extenuating stressors.
Citations

0
Authors

Ram P Agarwal | Adarsh Kumar | John E Lewis
Published

2015
Journal

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume / Issue

21:152
Author's primary institution

Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL

Your stories


Be the first to share your story


Have your say!


Find

Use these buttons to find teachers, venues and teacher training for this condition


Disclaimer
You can transform life’s challenges and create the life you love.
Our community will inspire, inform and equip you.

The Yoga Map Project will blow you away with the personal stories of people transforming their lives through yoga. Add your story to get celebrated for your journey, to inspire other yogis on the same path, and to get the whole world on its mat.

Yoga will help you with all of life’s big challenges – whether you want to banish the blues, deal with anxiety and stress, or cope with a serious illness like cancer. Don’t believe us? Get stuck into over 300 clinical studies from renowned institutions proving the power of yoga for 30+ health conditions.

Our designers have transformed their own lives through yoga, and they’d love to inspire you as you transform yours. Shop our unique, curated range of collections from yoga loving, independent designers around the globe.

Stay up-to-date with what’s trending in the online yoga world through our #PoweredByYoga aggregated social stream. See which pins are making waves on Pinterest and what yoga stories are being shared through Instagram. Don’t forget to tag your #PoweredByYoga story to be featured!

Our teachers, venues and TTOs are the core of our mission. By sharing your schedules, creating a professional profile, offering your online classes, training courses + more, you can help others transform their lives and find the power of yoga.

We want to get the world on its mat but we need your help. We’re looking for volunteers to help us promote the power of yoga so that everyone gets a sense of what it can do for them. If you know the power of yoga and want to help us spread the word - with blogging, social media, PR or marketing - please contact lucy@yogaclicks.com.

Sign up to see more. Live dangerously! It's free!